How to Create a Zig-Zag Twistback | Cute Hairstyles

April 20, 2014

If you care to venture back to our earliest days on this website, you will find several tightly twisted or braided hairstyles… some involving a zig-zag part. Zig-Zag Twistbacks | Rope Braid I stumbled upon my earliest hairstyle album a few weeks ago and found a photo of this style that we have never filmed before. Today is the day that we show you how to create a Zig-Zag Twistback! Rope Braid Tieback Hairstyle Zig-Zag Twistbacks | Rope Braid My 3rd daughter volunteered to be our model, and here we show you first how to create the zig-zag part, and then how to incorporate four twistbacks into a super cute tieback. Zig-Zag Twistbacks | Rope Braid Zig-Zag Twistbacks | Rope Braid Zig-Zag Twistbacks | Rope Braid Zig-Zag Twistbacks | Rope Braid You could actually use this hairstyle in a combo with a bun, for a super beautiful updo! Feel free to tag your own photos of this hairstyle with: #CGHZigZagTwists My girls often wore this style to sports activities, such as soccer and softball, because the twisting pulled the hair out of their eyes. Better yet, the hairstyle stays fairly well after a long active day! That being said, this twistback hairstyle can also be worn by girls of all ages, especially as “half-up, half-down” hairstyles are very popular right now! Enjoy! Items Needed: Brush, rat-tail comb, spray bottle, 1 small hair elastic, 2 alligator clips, spray wax or hairspray, accessory {if desired}. Time Requirement: 5-8 minutes Skill Level: Medium Step-by-Step Instructions:

  1. To begin, comb all the hair away from the face towards the back of the head…
  2. Then with a rat-tail comb, part from left to right in a diagonal direction to create the first “Zig”…
  3. Near the end of the first zig, take the comb and part toward the left to create the next “Zag”.
  4. Repeat this one more time, to create two equal sections of hair on either side, with a nice zig zag part line down the middle…
  5. Now go back to the first triangle section of hair, nearest the face and use a comb to continue the partline down next to the ear, or simply use your finger to create a rough part…
  6. Except that section, pull all remaining hair out of the way and secure until you need it…
  7. Using the hair from the first triangle section, grab a strand of hair near the front and divide it into two equal strands…
  8. Begin a rope twist with those two strands {give the hair a gentle twist to the right before crossing it over each other, to ensure the twist remains tight}…
  9. Repeat a rope twist, adding in hair on both sides with each stitch, until you run out of hair near the ear…
  10. Continue twisting the rest of the strands into a rope braid, and have your daughter hold, or secure with an alligator clip…
  11. Repeat Steps 5-10 on each of the three remaining sections of the Zig Zag, which will give you two rope twists on each side of the head…
  12. Gather all four twists together, combine them, and secure with an elastic into a tieback on the back of the head.
  13. Add hair spray or accessory {as desired}.

Please feel free to leave me a comment below letting us know what you think of this Zig-Zag Twistbacks hairstyle! As always, if you loved the tutorial, please feel free to share it! Happy Hairstyling! BrooklyAndBailey‘s video for this week showed us all how to create the most vibrant Easter eggs using ingredients you have at home! Sure beats those pale egg-dying kits you can buy at the store! Simply click below to watch…

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How to know if you have ADHD | Mom Minute

April 19, 2014

Most of you will not know this, but our son was diagnosed with hyposensitivity disorder as an infant when he wouldn’t respond to normal everyday stimuli. Through years of several types of therapy, including the implementation of a multi-sensory environment for him, he has been able to progress significantly.

As we felt we’ve been able to manage that hurdle fairly well, our son was just recently diagnosed with ADHD.

ADHD

After years of low points, and feeling like failing parents more than any parent should, two months into his kindergarten year, Little Buddy was expelled for several days. Without going into details, the ruling was that he was becoming an extreme danger to the students and his teachers.

This wasn’t the first sign of problems in school, it had gradually built up over those first two months despite close observation and guidance at school and at home. We literally did not know what to do at that point, or where to turn.

There’s plenty more I could share about those years, but I am just not ready to do so. That behavior wasn’t my son and I knew it, my son was my son and I love him no matter what. But it wasn’t easy, and there were nights where I cried for hours and felt like the most awful mother for not being able to help him.

We of course prayed heavily about how we could give Little Buddy what he needed to be successful, without enabling bad behavior. We’d dreaded even thinking about ADHD or early Autism, but felt we couldn’t help him solve his problem if we couldn’t find its root. This diagnosis was not something we took lightly, as he is a boy, and boys often are extremely energetic and inattentive. But something seemed off.

The diagnosis, and all the research we had done previous to it, helped place Little Buddy’s early years’ behavior into context. Especially as the ADHD was paired with the Hyposensitivity Disorder, making the early years a very frustrating situation for him.

We tried specialized diets and certain types of in-home therapy, but there was little improvement. We then spoke to our pediatrician about it, who recommended that Little Buddy was old enough that we could take him to a child psychiatrist for analysis.

The subsequent help we have received, via careful medication and therapy {for Little Buddy and us}, has made a world of difference in our son’s behavior! He’s advanced one full year in academics in just two months, reads like a pro, follows instructions, and shows those sweetest sides of himself nearly all the time. He’s happier, and doesn’t want to go back to the way things were before.

Kids who have ADHD are wonderful! Now that we are aware of the disorder, we are finding more and more people we know who are very successful adults who are also medicated or therapy-aided ADHDers! We all have imperfections, the key is to not let them define us. We work through them the best we can, try to learn to be confident in who we are, and that’s what makes us beautiful!

One of our viewers, Sarah, wrote in asking… “I think my child has ADHD. How can I be sure, and how can I help him/her if he does?

How to know if you have ADHD

So for today’s #MomMinute on The Moms View, we invited Dr. Chiovanni Chopra, a Board-Certified Child and Adolescent Psychiatrist, to come and talk with us about ADHD, its symptoms, provide her recommendations on how to manage it, and specifically address Sarah’s question.

For more information, go to Premier Mind Institute and, under “Resources“, click the link to the national organization’s page about ADHD.

To watch our discussion, simply click the video below…

For any of our readers, I am curious to hear what your experiences have been with ADHD or knowing someone who has. {Please keep in mind, that each situation is different. There are varying opinions and treatments out there, as well as some harsh judgements, and not every approach will work for everyone.}

Please free to leave your comments below…

Happy Parenting!

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How to Create a 4-Strand Waterfall Braid

April 13, 2014

Yes, we are taking a trip back in time to add a feature to a hairstyle that we made near the very beginning of this website. Today we are going to show you how to add a 4th strand to the Waterfall Braid!

Four-Strand Waterfall Braid

If you know the Dutch Braid stranding or stitching, then this braid will be a cinch for you! Feel free to tag your own photos of this hairstyle with: #CGH4StrandWaterfall

Bailey has loved our Waterfall Braids the most, out of all my girls, and wanted to be our model for today. In fact, it was Bailey’s idea to pancake the braid, which really makes it stand out!

Four-Strand Waterfall Braid

If you have longer hair, feel free to continue the braid around the back.

For shorter hair, you may create a braid on both sides of the head, and bring them back into a tieback, or simply what we have done here and have a single accent braid. The 4-Strand Waterfall Braids are beautiful any way to style them!

Four-Strand Waterfall Braid

Four-Strand Waterfall Braid

Four-Strand Waterfall Braid

Four-Strand Waterfall Braid

Bailey has worn this to school and had lots of compliments, and I’ve worn it several times over the past year or so, with the same result!

FYI… this hairstyle would not be recommended for younger girls who are active during PE or recess, unless you bring two braids back into a tieback.

Enjoy!

Items Needed: Brush, rat-tail comb, spray bottle, 2 small bobby pins, hairspray {if desired}.

Time Requirement: 3-5 minutes

Skill Level: Easy

Step-by-Step Instructions:

* Note: The hair you use in the initial stranding will be the hair that runs throughout the entire braid. If your hair is layered, or shorter in the front, it will be difficult to carry this braid all around the head without the layered ends sticking out.

  1. Begin by parting the hair on one side of the head…
  2. Next, pick up a good sized section of hair in the front next to the part line,and divide it into 4 equal strands…
  3. Take the top-most strand {closest to the part line} and take it under the 2nd strand, over the 3rd strand, and under the 4th strand…
  4. Now release that strand and allow it to fall {becoming the first waterfalling strand}…
  5. You should now be left with three strands to braid…
  6. Then, complete one simple 3-strand Dutch braid stitch by taking the middle strand over the right strand, and then taking the new middle strand over the left strand…
  7. Next, pick up a new small strand of hair next to the part line and use this as a new fourth strand of hair…
  8. Repeat Steps #3-7, always creating one simple 3-strand Dutch braid stitch in-between dropping through the 4th strand, and adding a new one.
  9. Braid until you are comfortable with the look…
  10. Now, lift a small section of hair on the side near the back, using crossed bobby pins to secure the end of the braid, and then let that hair fall to cover the bobby pins…
  11. To really make the braid POP, gently tug on the elbows of the braid to pancake it.
  12. Add hairspray {if desired}.

Please feel free to leave me a comment below letting us know what you think of this Pancaked Four-Strand Waterfall Braid! As always, if you loved the tutorial, please feel free to share it!

Happy Hairstyling!

Apparently “Room Tours” are all the rage for young teens on YouTube these days, giving other teens ideas on how to decorate their rooms. I think BrooklyAndBailey has a record for the oldest room tour on YouTube with their latest video, their reactions to their first bedroom when they were 3 1/2 years old! They will have you laughing for sure, simply click below to watch…

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Best Advice I’ve Been Given | Mom Minute

April 12, 2014

I am very grateful for all the wonderful advice given to me over the years, particularly from my grandmothers, my mom, and friends. Not only for the advice given to me as a young girl and the challenges I had faced, but for advice given to me as I came into my own in motherhood.

Best Advice

Today’s #MomMinute question comes from Donna, who asks the following, “What is the best piece of advice you have ever been given?

Best Advice

I have to say that I am far from perfect, meaning I have a lot to work on as an individual, and as a wife and mother. But, there is a piece of advice I heard years ago that has always stuck with me. It is something that I went home and quickly memorized, and I recall that advice very often as an adult.

Want to know what it is?

To see the entire episode, including the best advice I have ever been given, please feel free to click the video below…

For any of our readers, how would you answer Alisha’s question? What is the best piece of advice you have ever been given?

Please free to leave your comments below…

Happy Parenting!

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How to Create a Knotted Braid Tieback | Braid Hairstyles

April 06, 2014

During the past five years, we have shown you how to use knots in hairstyles several times, but this is a first for us using them in a tieback.

Knotted Braid Tieback

For today, Brooklyn and I will show you how to create a knotted braid tieback {yes, with me wearing a Marvel Avengers t-shirt… another first}! If you can make the first stitch of tying your shoelaces, you can create this knotted braid!

Knotted Braid Tieback

What I love about this knotted tieback in a half-up half-down hairstyle, is the unique “crown” look that it provides. By adding a cute bow or other accessory, you will have a braided hairstyle that will bring many compliments your way!

Feel free to tag your own photos of this hairstyle with: #CGHKnotBraidTieback

Knotted Braid Tieback
Knotted Braid Tieback
Knotted Braid Tieback

When we were done, Brooklyn said that this would be a great hairstyle for a flower girl, especially if you added curls to the hair and flowers to accent the braid!

Enjoy!

Items Needed: Brush, rat-tail comb, spray bottle, 1 small hair elastic, 1 bobby pin, hairspray and accessory {if desired}.

Time Requirement: 3-5 minutes

Skill Level: Medium

Step-by-Step Instructions:

  1. Begin by dividing the hair down the middle of the head…
  2. Now, part another straight line about 1-1 ½ inches above the ear going back towards the back of head…
  3. From there, create a new part going from the middle part to the line you just created {you should now have a rectangular section of hair parted out, with remaining hair still falling over the ear}…
  4. While holding this parted section, gather and pull the rest of the hair over the opposite shoulder and secure it out of the way…
  5. At the top corner of the rectangular-parted section, pick up a small piece and divide it into two smaller strands…
  6. Take the back strand over the front strand, wrap the front strand over, then under and pull it through the loop to create the first knot {similar to the first stitch of tying your shoe}…
  7. Similar to a French Braid, add in hair into both strands…
  8. Create a second knot, just like in Step #6, and then add in more hair…
  9. Repeat Steps #6-7  until you have about 5 knots and run out of hair…
  10. When all of your hair is added in, go ahead and create a few more knot stitches without adding any hair, using pomade or hairspray to help hold in flyaways {these extra knots will float freely, allowing for the braid to be tied back behind the head later}…
  11. Secure that braid with an elastic and use a bobby pin to hold the hair in place until you are done with the other side…
  12. Now, repeat the entire process on the other side of the head…
  13. After the second braid is complete, bring both braids back and combine the two into one tieback with an elastic..
  14. Add hairspray and hair accessory {like a bow} to finish off the style.

Please feel free to leave me a comment below letting us know what you think of this Knotted Braid Tieback! As always, if you loved the tutorial, please feel free to share it!

Happy Hairstyling!

By request from their young fans, my daughter Brooklyn filmed a Contacts 101 tutorial on Wednesday that she uploaded to her BrooklyAndBailey YouTube channel! If you have young tweens or teens who wear glasses, feel free to let them watch Brooklyn’s contact lens tutorial below…

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